Green News

A better environment, A better World.
April 10, 2009

Shooting the Underwater Delights Off the British Shores

Posted by : admin
Filed under : Enviornment News

Shooting with a camera is probably the best way to help conserve nature. Nothing inspires you more than a magical photograph that conveys the beauty, majesty and sheer brilliance of each of nature’s very special creations.

The annual British Society of Underwater Photographers / DIVER Print competition (for the best British print) has thrown up some of the most astonishing and simply amazing pics of the world that lay hidden in the depths off the British shoreline. The contests saw some of the very best underwater photography come to light and one look at not just the winning snap, but the other one’s that made the top 10 remind you of what we would miss if we don’t preserve and nurture natural ecosystems.

A male corkwing wrasse building a nest, by Robert Bailey

A male corkwing wrasse building a nest, by Robert Bailey

This year’s winning photo is of a male Corkwing wrasse building a nest, by Robert Bailey. The fish is scurrying around the reef to find a place of nesting and then carefully collects the best looking seaweed to decorate it. Yup, that’s the “mate” doing some home decoration to make sure he gets a date.

The other impressive snaps include a fireworks anemone casting a shadow of death on a lobster, painted Goby waiting with its mouth wide open, a fearsome looking Wolfish ruling the dark crevices, a John Dorry in all its spiky majesty and the thriving reef in all its brilliant colors.

A painted goby fish by Cathy Lewis

A painted goby fish by Cathy Lewis

Of course, there are a lot more magical moments on offer and the whole competition not only produces images that make you go ‘wow!’, but also force you to sit up and take notice of nature conservation.

A thriving reef by Dave Peak

A thriving reef by Dave Peak

This is one shooting spree we highly recommend and love, but there’s a question to ask in the end. Did any of the animals been mistreated? Is it wise to “invade” their space and take pictures of their lives? Don’t do to others what you wouldn’t do to yourself …










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